[JFT Press Release] Free (Yes, Free) Introductory Japanese Lessons at Japan Foundation Toronto + Photographic Exhibition and Library Opening

2-day Japanese Lesson!

Dates: Lesson 1. 6/15, Lesson2. 6/22

*Participants are expected to attend both lessons

Time: 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM (Doors open at 5:30 PM)

Location: The Japan Foundation, Toronto

131 Bloor Street West, Suite 213, Toronto, ON

Fee: Classes – no charge, Textbook required (approximately $10)

*The textbook is available at cost at the Japan Foundation, Toronto

Registration required: Deadline 6/10, 2011

Apply online http://www.jftor.org/whatson/rsvp.php

(Please note that the registration may close earlier if the total number of participants reaches maxi­mum capacity before this date.)

Level: Introductory. It is designed for people with little or no previous knowledge of Japanese. It focuses on Katakana, one of the three Japanese writing systems, which is used mainly for onomatopoeia and foreign words.

Inquiry: info@jftor.org or 416-966-1600 ext.230

Photographic Exhibition and Library Opening

March 15 – July 29, 2011 Exhibition extended until July 29

The Grand Shrine of Ise: Photographs by Haruo Nakano

Exhibition presented by The Japan Foundation

Participating Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival

GALLERY HOURS

Monday: 11:30 am – 7:00 pm EXTENDED HOURS

Tuesday: 11:30 am – 4:30 pm

Wednesday: 11:30 am – 4:30 pm

Thursdays: 11:30 am – 7:00 pm EXTENDED HOURS

Friday: 11:30 am – 4:30 pm

Saturday openings: Noon – 5:00 pm, June 4 & 18, July 9

Doors Open Toronto: May 28 & 29, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

CLOSED

other Saturdays & Sundays

July 1 (Canada Day)

Admission: Free

The Grand Shrine of Ise is raised in honour of two central deities: Amaterasu, the sun goddess, and Toyouke, the goddess of prosperity. The legend of the shrine’s origin goes back over two thousand years, and historical records can be traced back to the seventh century. Historically, the Imperial Family of Japan has maintained a long relationship with the Shrine. Beginning as recently as the 18th century, pilgrimages to the Grand Shrine have become one of the most popular entertainments in the life of the nation.

The shrines of the two main goddesses are surrounded by those of a total of 123 other gods. Because of the animistic aspect of the Shinto religion, every single element or phenomenon of nature is symbolized by some divine character. Countless gods and goddesses all serve these main goddesses in order to achieve the happiness and harmony of Japan and the universe. This intimate relationship with nature is revealed to be a fundamental characteristic of Japanese culture.

The official photographer of the Grand Shrine, Haruo Nakano, was born and raised in the city of Ise. The sacred property and forest of the Grand Shrine used to be his childhood playground. Nakano still resides in Ise and visits the Shrine virtually every day, so his camera seems to capture even invisible exchanges between nature and people.

All photographs are printed on washi, hand-made Japanese paper, and framed using timber from the sacred forest of the Shrine. Along with the delicate but noble photography, the contemporary craftsmanship contributes to this exhibition to deliver the spirit of the holy forest.

Copyright: The Japan Foundation, Japanese-language Institute, Kansai

 

2-day Japanese Lesson!

Dates: Lesson 1. 6/15, Lesson2. 6/22 

*Participants are expected to attend both lessons

Time: 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM (Doors open at 5:30 PM)

Location: The Japan Foundation, Toronto

131 Bloor Street West, Suite 213, Toronto, ON

Fee: Classes – no charge, Textbook required (approximately $10)

*The textbook is available at cost at the Japan Foundation, Toronto

Registration required: Deadline 6/10, 2011

Apply online http://www.jftor.org/whatson/rsvp.php

(Please note that the registration may close earlier if the total number of participants reaches maxi­mum capacity before this date.)

Level: Introductory. It is designed for people with little or no previous knowledge of

Japanese. It focuses on Katakana, one of the three Japanese writing systems, which is used mainly for onomatopoeia and foreign words.

Inquiry: info@jftor.org or 416-966-1600 ext.230

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About Peter Dyloco
Sophomore at the Queen's School of Business actively completing a Bachelor of Commerce (Honours) degree with a specialisation in finance. Background in corporate finance, product portfolio planning and marketing. Strong interest in pursuing a career within investment banking or the commercial side of the automotive industry, with long term aspirations in Japanese public policy and contributing to the economic revitalisation of Japan. I remain open to new opportunities and to hearing insight from similarly passionate people. Peter Dyloco

One Response to [JFT Press Release] Free (Yes, Free) Introductory Japanese Lessons at Japan Foundation Toronto + Photographic Exhibition and Library Opening

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